Page tree

Versions Compared

Key

  • This line was added.
  • This line was removed.
  • Formatting was changed.

...

5.34.        The SBR of the Bank of Italy contains information for the entire corporate sector (about 1.5 million units), with the exception of small, sole-proprietor firms. The coverage of the SBR, in terms of turnover, is nearly 90 per cent, and even higher for cross-border operations.[13] Given the tight deadline for the production of BOP data, timeliness is a particularly critical factor for the Bank’s SBR. The register is therefore updated daily with online data transmissions. This allows for the timely accounting of changes in the population of firms, which in some cases may significantly affect the external sector statistics, especially FDI. An SBR that is always up to date also contributes to the smooth running of back-office activities, such as  the help desk, formal communications to enterprises and sanction procedures.

...

5.41.        In the new version of the register, INE includes information on foreign ownership and on involvement in trade (in services), following the guidelines designed in the Inter-American Development Bank  project for the Latin American Business Register and MSIT 2010. In Uruguay, the SBR will serve as the main tool for detecting enterprises engaged in international trade in services. As part of its new design, information on main and secondary activities, goods and services produced and the destination of the sales (national or foreign and country of destination), the origin of capital (national or foreign) and foreign ownership will also be included. A new survey will subsequently be designed to better estimate international trade in services and FATs. More information on the definition of statistical units used in the SBR of Uruguay is available online.



Anchor
[1]
[1]
[1] See Guidelines on Integrated Economic Statistics, United Nations publication, chap. 5, sect. C; see also information on the Task Force established to draft international guidelines on statistical business registers, available from www.unece.org/task_force_business_registers.html

Anchor
[2]
[2]
[2] African Development Bank, Guidelines for Building Statistical Business Registers in Africa: Laying the Foundation for the Harmonization of Economic Statistics Programs (Tunis, 2014). Available from .  www.afdb.org/en/knowledge/publications/guidelines-for-building-statistical-business-registers-in-africa.

Anchor
[3]
[3]
[3] Further details on the European experience in that respect can be found in Eurostat, Business Registers: Recommendations Manual.  

Anchor
[4]
[4]
[4] Overall quality is not easy to measure, although several of its specific aspects can be used as indicators, e.g., coverage, accuracy of the data held, frequency of updates and consistency of processes (see also chapter 20).

Anchor
[5]
[5]
[5] See Guidelines on Integrated Economic Statistics, para. 3.29.

Anchor
[6]
[6]
[6]See International Recommendations for Industrial Statistics 2008 (IRIS 2008), Statistical Papers, Series M, No. 90  (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.08.XVII.8), para. 2.15.

Anchor
[7]
[7]
[7] Ibid., para. 2.12

Anchor
[8]
[8]
[8] In addition to the 2008 SNA, IRIS 2008 and the fourth revision of the International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities, see Statistics Division “Statistical Units” (October 2007), available from http://unstats.un.org/unsd/industry/docs/stat_2008_6.pdf.

Anchor
[9]
[9]
[9] Guidelines on Integrated Economic Statistics, para. 5.67.

Anchor
[10]
[10]
[10] Compilers interested in learning more about the detailed aspects involved in the establishment of an effective statistical business register should consult Eurostat, Business Registers: Recommendations Manual.

Anchor
[11]
[11]
[11] Eurostat, Business Registers: Recommendations Manual, para. 4.4.

Anchor
[12]
[12]
[12] At the time of writing of the present Guide, the two institutions are working together to overcome the mentioned legal obstacles.

Anchor
[13]
[13]
[13] In terms of number of enterprises, the coverage of the Bank of Italy business register is about 33 per cent. The apparently low percentage is explained by the fact that the numerous “individual firms” are excluded. In other words, the true population frame of the register is actually the corporate sector, for which the coverage is complete (100 per cent). In any case, the cross-border transactions of individual firms are covered through the tax authority’s data; their cross-border transactions represent about 5 per cent of the total in the “other services” aggregate.