Welcome GuestHomeLogin



»



PoweredBy

« Agricultural censuses and surveys »

  • + Uses of agricultural censuses and surveys for gender statistics
    • Agricultural censuses and surveys can serve as a vehicle for collecting data on the type and amount of work contributed by women and men to the agricultural production. These censuses and surveys cover four main areas of gender statistics. First, information on the composition of farm labour can be provided by recording sex and other characteristics of the household members and hired labourers working on the agricultural holding. Second, information on gender differences in the management of agricultural holdings and decision-making within the holding can be provided by collecting data on the characteristics of the agricultural holders and sub-holders and combining those data with other data at the level of holding or sub-holding on the size and types of crops, size and types of livestock, or agricultural services used, for example. Third, information on gender differences in ownership of agricultural assets can be provided by collecting data on land tenure, livestock, and agricultural machinery. These data may be collected at holding level, level of parcels/plots or herds, or level of household members. Fourth, information on gender differences in access to agricultural services and agricultural practices can be provided by collecting data on use of formal credit, extension services, veterinary services, irrigation or agricultural machinery. These data may be collected at holding level or sub-holding level.

      The role of agricultural censuses and surveys in obtaining statistics on gender and agriculture has to be considered within an integrated system of producing gender statistics. Some topics related to agriculture – such as agricultural production and farm income, employment in agricultural sector, or food security - may be covered in other data collection programmes, such as living standard surveys, population censuses, labour force surveys, or demographic and health surveys. For example, detailed data on occupations and status in employment by industry (including the agricultural sector) are often covered in population censuses and labour force surveys. Also, Living Standard Measurement Surveys (LSMS) in less developed regions often include modules on agricultural production, agricultural labour and food security. In particular, the LSMS Integrated Surveys on Agriculture (LSMS-ISA) are designed to have a strong focus on agriculture. Still, the coverage in agricultural censuses and surveys of topics similar to those collected in other censuses or surveys can have an important value added in gender statistics. For example, although labour force and population censuses may collect data on economic activity for all population, using a ”current activity” approach, agricultural censuses and surveys may collect data on economic activity for persons living in agricultural households, using a “usual activity” approach, which is expected to better capture the subtleties of seasonal and intermittent economic activity in agriculture. Agricultural censuses and surveys may also collect more information about work in agriculture as a secondary or tertiary activity.

      A balanced coverage of gender issues between the agricultural censuses and the agricultural surveys should be considered. Agricultural surveys are usually conducted more often than censuses and cover only a sample of agricultural holdings. Thus, more detailed questions related to gender and agriculture may be accommodated in agricultural surveys. Some countries may choose to carry out thematic agricultural surveys that are focused on gender. Such surveys would include, for example, comprehensive questions on women and men participation in farm labour and management of agricultural holdings and sub-holdings; their status as owners of agricultural resources; and agricultural practices and agricultural services they use.

  • + Avoiding gender-bias in data collection
    • Integration of gender concerns into the planning and design of agricultural censuses and surveys

      The adoption of a gender perspective in agricultural censuses or surveys has to be decided in the first stages of planning of the agricultural census or survey, because it has significant implications in terms of topics covered, census and surveys operations such as data collection design and training of field staff, and, at a later stage, data analysis and dissemination. An analysis of agricultural censuses undertaken in Africa in the 2000 census round showed, for example, that the production of statistics on gender and agriculture is improved when the need for gender statistics is incorporated into the objectives and scope of the censuses (FAO Regional Office for Africa, 2005). The analysis also showed that the process of obtaining gender statistics improves when potential users of gender statistics, with clear demands of specific data, are involved in the preparation of the censuses.

      Coverage of all relevant units of enumeration

      Gender bias in data collection can be introduced by improper coverage of all relevant units of enumeration. The unit of enumeration in agricultural censuses and surveys is the agricultural holding. An agricultural holding is an economic unit of agricultural production under single management, comprising all livestock kept and all land used wholly or partly for agricultural production purposes, without regard to title, legal form or size (FAO, 2007). There are two types of agricultural holdings: (a) holdings in the household sector – that is, those operated by household members; and (b) holdings in the non-household sector, such as corporations and government institutions.

      Proper coverage of the household sector is the most important from the perspective of generating gender statistics. The exclusion of small holdings, a sub-sector where women and family members play a particularly important role, can be a drawback of agricultural censuses or surveys. When holdings below a certain size and/or holdings located in urban or peri-urban areas are excluded from censuses and surveys, women’s contribution to agricultural production may be underestimated. In addition, these excluded holdings could be playing an important role in food production and food security.

      The inclusion of all units relevant to agricultural production needs to be considered when preparing the frame of agricultural holdings in the household sector and when designing the sampling frame for agricultural surveys. In particular, frames based on administrative sources where women are less likely than men to have their holdings registered can introduce significant gender-bias in data obtained. Gender differentials also need to be considered when deciding the stratification variables in the sampling design of agricultural surveys. When necessary, oversampling in one or more strata should be considered to allow for an adequate number of both women- and men-operated holdings in each stratum.

      Adequate units of data collection and analysis

      Comprehensive coverage of gender issues in agricultural censuses and surveys requires the use of multiple units both in the data collection stage as well as in the data analysis stage. As noted before, the unit of enumeration in agricultural censuses and surveys is the agricultural holding. Many censuses and surveys collect most of the data at the level of agricultural holding. For example, data on inputs for agricultural production, such as seeds or pesticides, are usually purchased for the whole holding and therefore they are collected at the level of the holding. Other examples of items usually collected at the holding level are the use of irrigation or use of agricultural machinery.

      However, it may be necessary to collect and analyse data at intra-holding level in order to get a true picture on gender issues. Data on farm labour, especially data on participation of household members in activities of agricultural production, can be better captured at individual level, along with data on sex, age, marital status, educational attainment, or other characteristics related to the type and amount of work performed on the farm or for other business.

      Depending on the country, data on land use and livestock are sometimes more suitable to be collected for smaller units within the holding. For example, data on land use are often collected at the level of parcels or plots that compose a holding. More general, data can be collected at the sub-holding level. A sub-holding is defined as a single agricultural activity or group of activities managed by a particular person or group of persons (sub-holders) in the holder's household on behalf of the agricultural holder. There may be one or more sub-holdings in a holding. A sub-holding could comprise a single plot, a whole field, a whole parcel, or even the whole holding. A sub-holding could also be a livestock operation associated with a plot, field or parcel, or a livestock operation without any land.

      The collection of data on crops and livestock at the more disaggregated level may be preferred for several reasons. First, collecting data at the level of parcels or plots reduces the errors in reporting. This is especially the case when agricultural households work on several different plots of land, and different individuals are in charge of each plot or crop; or, when some household members are responsible for herds that are separated from those of the main holder. Gathering the data at plot level and herd level may appear as more time consuming. However, when data are collected at the whole farm level, the respondents may have by themselves to add up the information on different plots to come up with the required answer, increasing the chances for non sampling errors like reporting errors. The quality of data improves when women and men in charge of each plot or crop respond separately to questions about the plots or crops for which they are responsible. The operator of each plot is more likely to know specific details about the size and quality of the plot, how much time each household member has spent working on various tasks on that particular plot. Second, plots from the same holding may differ in terms of land quality, the degree of land degradation and erosion, and the data collected at their level may explain differences in agricultural production. Finally, disaggregated data at the level of sub-holdings are crucial for understanding gender roles and decision-making within the agricultural holding.

      It is, however, to be noted that in most cases the application of sub-holding concept on the ground poses many practical challenges and increases the cost of data collection. Before deciding to apply this concept for large scale survey like an agricultural census a careful evaluation of social customs and cost-benefits of using this concept is recommended.

      Questionnaire design

      Gender-specific conceptual and measurement issues related to the topics covered in agricultural censuses and surveys have to be adequately reflected in the design of questionnaires used (see box 3.3 for a checklist of the main points that should be taken into account in designing questionnaires). It is important, from a gender perspective, that the questionnaire corresponding to the household sector is structured by the needed level of data collection. In that respect, different modules may be designed for different levels of data collection and/or different topics. For example, data collected at individual level may be covered by a module on demographic, social and economic characteristics of household members, including involvement in agricultural and non-agricultural economic activities on and off the holding; and a module on characteristics of non-family agricultural labour. Identification of the owners of agricultural resources and sub-holders may also be based at data collected at the level of individual household members.

      Some other modules of the questionnaire, such as those on livestock or land use, may be designed to collect data at sub-holding level with the possibility of identification of the sub-holder. The implementation of the sub-holding/sub-holder concepts, important from a gender perspective, may be complex. The approach used by a country will depend on national agricultural practices and social and cultural conditions, taking into consideration the data collection methodology already existing or suitable. For example, when countries have the practice of collecting data on crops at the plot level and data on livestock at the herd level, it is relatively straightforward to identify the women and men who are in charge of those parcels and herds (sub-holders). Alternatively, a smaller set of items can be collected at the level of sub-holdings separately from the main crop and livestock data, by asking specific questions about the type of crop and livestock activities carried out under the control of the sub-holder.

      Box 3. 3 Incorporating a gender perspective in the design of questionnaires for agricultural censuses and surveys. A checklist

      Members of the team designing the questionnaires have been trained in gender issues and gender-specific measurement issues related to family and non-family farm labour and role of women as managers of holdings and sub-holdings.

      For the household sector, there is a clear indication of the items to be collected at holding level, at sub-holding level, or at individual level of household members and hired labourers. If possible, identification of holders, sub-holders and owners allow the link with the individual characteristics of the household members.

      When identifying the sub-holders, use a series of questions about each household member to find out about the types of work each carried out on the holding and their role in managing agricultural production activities.

      Use of a series of questions instead of one question to identify the household members owning by themselves or jointly with another person parcels/plots of land, livestock by type, and agricultural machinery.

      Avoid language suggesting that holder or sub-holders are male.

      When measuring economic activity, the question should have a note for the interviewers indicating the use of activity lists (provided in the manual) and follow up probing questions.

      Language in the questionnaire should be carefully used to avoid that the agricultural work of women is perceived and reported as housework rather than as economic activity.

      If household head needs to be identified, a short note on the questionnaire should indicate the criteria of identification


      Selection and training of the field staff

      The quality of data collected in agricultural censuses and surveys (similar to other data collection programmes) depends on the quality of staff selected and the training provided. Box 3.4 presents a list of factors that should be taken into account when incorporating a gender perspective in the preparation of manuals and training of interviewers for agricultural censuses and surveys.

      It should be noted that men are greatly overrepresented among field staff in agricultural censuses and surveys, often as a result of using as interviewers workers in agricultural extension services who are predominantly men. In general, it is important that both women and men are selected as interviewers and supervisors, and both women and men are trained to obtain quality data from both female and male respondents. In particular, the recruitment of women operators should be seriously considered in countries where women farmers do not feel free to talk directly to male enumerators due to cultural factors.

      Box 3. 4 Incorporating a gender perspective in the preparation of manuals and training of interviewers for agricultural censuses and surveys - A checklist

      Identify the key gender issues prevailing in the agricultural sector in the country of interest.

      Gender training should emphasize gender-related objectives and goals of the census.

      Gender training should increase awareness about the role of women in managing holdings and sub-holdings.

      Both women and men are selected as training instructors and as trainers presented in audio-visual materials.

      Interviewers women and men should be trained to interview persons of the same sex and of the opposite sex.

      The language and examples given in the manuals or training materials with regard to identification of agricultural holders and sub-holders and the household head are free of gender-based biases.

      Manuals and training materials provide examples on identifying joint agricultural holders.

      Manuals and training materials should show examples for identifying the real decision maker in the farm. In particular, persons who are usually absent from the household should not be declared as household head or agricultural holder.

      Training provides guidelines in obtaining information from women and men in charge of each plot or crop.

      When collecting data on economic activity, provide in the manuals lists of economic activities, including lists of own-account productive activities and probing lists, to avoid underreporting of women’s economic activity. Training should emphasize problems and stereotypes associated with women’s work.


      Census advertising

      The census advertising is an important tool for improving the census coverage, in particular, of small holdings managed by women, and the reporting of women’s agricultural activity. The presentations prepared for advertising should illustrate both women’s and men’s contribution to agricultural production. The choice of type of media should take into account the fact that women may have easier access to some types of media than others. For example, in certain groups of population, women are more likely than men to be illiterate. Women may be easier to reach by radio programmes targeted at women or by use of graphics in places where women tend to gather together.


  • + Selected topics
    • Traditionally, agricultural censuses and surveys have been mainly concerned with agricultural production and the productive resources used, and dedicated no or only minimal attention to the human resources involved. This sub-section presents four topics essential for understanding the contribution of women and men to the agricultural production. The addition of these topics, to the more traditional topics focused on agricultural production and agricultural resources, improves the role of agricultural censuses and surveys in the production of gender statistics. For each of the four topics presented, there are shown the relevance of data collected for gender statistics and how to improve data collection from a gender perspective.

  • + Family and non-family agricultural labour
    • Relevance for gender statistics

      Data on demographic and social characteristics of family members and non-family labourers working in agricultural production of the household are the basic information needed to understand the composition and the organization of the farm labour force in the household sector. Women and men involved in farm labour have often different characteristics in terms of age, marital status, and educational attainment.

      Data on the economic activity of each household member and the time they worked on and off the farm provide the basis for understanding the gender division of labour and gender-specific responsibilities within households. Women and men tend to spend unequal number of hours a day and invest unequal number of weeks or months during a year for agricultural work. They also tend to differ in terms of the importance attached to the agricultural work on the household holding – whether it is a sole occupation, major occupation or subsidiary occupation – and its combination with other economic activities on and off the holding.

      Data on duration of work in a year, number of hours a day and the type of payment received (in cash, in kind, or exchange) can show gender differences in the non-family farm labour. For example, women labourers may be hired in agricultural activities for shorter periods of time than men and they may be more likely than men to be paid in kind.

      Improving data collection from a gender perspective

      Data collection instruments should be designed to allow the recording of multiple agricultural and non-agricultural economic activities on and off the holding. Specific questions on primary and secondary activities should be included and the reference period should be long enough to capture seasonal and occasional work. It is useful to identify agricultural labour separately from non-agricultural labour and/or to ask specific questions about any job during the agricultural season that is related to agriculture (including jobs that are not the main job).

      Collecting data at sub-holding level can highlight gender differences in involvement of family and non-family labourers in particular agricultural activities or on particular parcels or plots. Women tend to be more often than men involved in multiple activities, working on their own plot, on their husband’s holding, seasonally as paid labourer in other holdings, and even in other non-agricultural jobs. Even within the same agricultural activity, women and men concentrate in one or another of the various stages of production.

      Collection of information on economic activity should cover all forms of unpaid work, including subsistence activities –such as fetching water and fuel wood, gathering wild fruits and berries, and processing of primary products for self-consumption. Women’s activities are often perceived as domestic and reproductive rather than economic and productive. However, these activities are an important input to the agricultural production. The definition adopted in data collection should adhere to international standards and include all forms of work falling within the production boundary of System of National Accounts (SNA). The data collection should use lists of agricultural activities or probing questions related to economic and productive activities that are usually perceived as domestic work. It is also important that the questions are carefully formulated to avoid the introduction of gender-based biases.


  • + Management of agricultural holdings and sub-holdings
    • Relevance for gender statistics

      The identification of the agricultural holder provides the basis for comparing the characteristics of holdings operated by women and men. Analysing aspects such as area of holding, cropping patterns, or use of different agricultural practices can show the specific problems faced by women and men in operating agricultural holdings. For example, data on main purpose of production – whether the holding is producing mainly for home consumption or for sale – are a broad indicator of the extent to which female holders and male holders are participating in the market economy. Men tend to be more involved in large-scale cash cropping, especially when highly mechanized, while women are more often responsible for food production and small-scale cultivation of cash crops. Women farmers may have more limited access to technology that would enhance their productivity and contribute to household food security - such as labour-saving technologies in food processing and storage. Additional data on characteristics of the agricultural holder other than sex – for example age, marital status, educational attainment and employment in other activities in non-agricultural sector; data on household size and composition; data on ownership of land, livestock and agricultural machinery; access to credit and improved seeds, as well participation to farmers’ organizations and extension services can also contribute to the understanding of some of the differences between the holdings operated by women and those operated by men.

      Within the agricultural holdings, women and men may undertake specific crops and livestock activities. For example, within the same household, women may be in charge of a small size kitchen garden and a small livestock for food consumption, while men may be in charge with large-area crops and large livestock intended for sale and obtaining cash income. Data collection on the characteristics of sub-holders and sub-holdings are the basis for understanding gender division of managerial responsibilities within the agricultural holdings. Data collected for sub-holders may refer to sex, age, marital status or educational attainment. Data collected for sub-holdings may refer, for example, to area managed, type of crops, purpose of crops, or number of animals by type of livestock.

      Improving data collection from a gender perspective

      The role of women needs to be adequately acknowledged in identifying the agricultural holder and properly reflected in the concepts used, questionnaire design, manuals and training materials. At conceptual level, the agricultural holder is defined as the person who makes major decisions regarding resource use and exercises management control over the agricultural holding operation (FAO, 2007). A gender bias in reporting the agricultural holder occurs when the role of women in decision-making is not taken into account. Often, the decision-making process on the holding is complex and it involves more than one person, men as well as women. However, because of inadequate concept of the holder, gender-biased attitude of respondents and enumerators or insufficient training, it is more likely that only a male senior holder is identified. For the 2010 round of agricultural censuses, FAO has modified the concept of agricultural holder to include a group of persons, for example husband and wife. If more than one person is involved in major decision-making, each of those persons should be considered as a joint holder. Also, a joint holder can come from the same household or from a different household.

      Manuals and training materials should prevent other sources of gender bias in identification of the main agricultural holder. The agricultural holder is often inadequately considered to be the same person as the household head. For example, a person in the household may be identified as a head, because of his or her overall authority and responsibility in the household; however, that person may not be actively involved in the household’s agricultural operations or may not be responsible for the holding. The use of concept of household head in itself may trigger gender bias, in the sense that women may be considered heads of their household only when no adult male is present. Furthermore, persons who are usually absent from the household may be declared as the main agricultural holder or as the main household head, either because of their role in providing input for the agricultural production (income or land, for example) or simply because of cultural representations of men as having potential more decision-making power than women.

      In the questionnaire design, a single question on who is the main decision-maker for the holding is often insufficient to identify the main holder. Instead, a series of questions about each household member, their work on the holding, and their role in managing the holding, may be needed. A similar approach is based on the use of sub-holding/sub-holder concepts. Rather than identifying the holder directly, the information obtained for each sub-holder can afterwards be used to determine the primary decision-maker on the holding.

      Data should be collected at sub-holding/sub-holder level as much as possible. The concept of an agricultural holder as the major decision-maker for the holding may not provide a realistic picture of the often complex decision-making processes of the holding. Often, different members of the household take responsibility for managing particular aspects of the operations of the holding. Sometimes, women carry out specific activities such as cultivating particular land plots or managing particular livestock activities. There may also be different levels of management; for example, one person may make the strategic decisions (“this year we plant potatoes”), while other people are responsible for operational decisions such as when to plant, who to employ, and how to market.

      Thus, the concept of agricultural holder alone may not adequately reflect the management of the holding, and, in particular, it may fail to recognize the role of women in managing agricultural activities. To overcome this problem, the concepts of “sub-holding” and the associated “sub-holder” have been introduced in by FAO for the 2010 census round. A sub-holder is defined as the person responsible for managing a sub-holding (a parcel, a plot, a livestock operation, an agricultural activity or group of activities) on the holder's behalf. The sub-holder concept is broadly similar to the concepts of “plot manager” and “farm operator” used in some countries. If sub-holdings are identified, each sub-holder should provide the information for the sub-holding he/she is responsible for. If the household head is the sole respondent of the question, this may have an impact on the accuracy of the responses concerning assets and work undertaken by the other sub-holders of the holding.


  • + Ownership of agricultural assets
    • Relevance for gender statistics

      Data on ownership of agricultural assets for holdings and sub-holdings is crucial in understanding agricultural productivity, crop patterns, use of inputs, or investment of time and resources in long-term land improvement for holdings operated by women and men. In many countries from the less developed regions there are great gender disparities in ownership of land, livestock and agricultural machinery. Women are less likely than men to hold land titles. The land and livestock owned by women also tend to be of smaller size. Lack of land tenure decreases women’s eligibility for formal sources of credit, membership in farmers' organizations, access to training and extension services, and their chances of developing their own business in agriculture.

      Sex-disaggregated data on ownership of assets and management of each sub-holding collected at the individual level of household members show who owns what, who has access to and control over which agricultural resources, and who decides on what agricultural activities will be undertaken. Data would also show whether women sub-holders, compared to men sub-holders, are more likely to manage owned or rented plots of land; or whether women are more likely to become the managers of a plot when they own that plot. This information is crucial in understanding intrahousehold gender inequality in access to agricultural resources.

      Improving data collection from a gender perspective

      As much as possible, data on ownership of land, livestock, and agricultural machinery should be collected for more disaggregated levels within the holding, at sub-holding level or at individual level of household members. The collection of data on land tenure at parcel or plot level is important from a gender perspective but not only. A holding may have one or more tenure types corresponding to each land parcel. In fact, the FAO guidelines on agricultural censuses (FAO, 2007) recommend as one of the supplementary items that land tenure is collected for each parcel. Similarly, in countries where herds of various types of animals are owned and managed separately by the husband or by the wife, data on the number of owned animals should also be collected at the sub-holding level.

      Identification of the household members who are the owners of agricultural assets in a holding or sub-holding should allow for joint ownership. Manuals and training materials should provide examples on how to avoid underreporting women’s co-ownership of agricultural assets. The ownership of a holding / sub-holding should also be decided independently from the management of that holding / sub-holding. For example, a husband and a wife own together two plots of land, and the husband is the sub-holder (manager) of one of the plots, while the woman is the sub-holder (manager) of the other plot. In this case, the ownership of each of the two plots should be recorded as joint ownership of a woman and a man, while the sub-holders should be identified as a man for one plot and as a woman for the other plot.

  • + Use of agricultural services and agricultural practices
    • Relevance for gender statistics

      Data on use of agricultural services and agricultural practices – such as use of credit, extension services, irrigation or use of veterinary services – collected in agricultural censuses and surveys are commonly used to understand aspects such as agricultural productivity, crop patterns, use of inputs or use of long-term investments in land or livestock. These data are usually collected at the holding level. Therefore, from a gender perspective, data obtained can be analysed disaggregated only by sex of the holder. The information obtained can show whether women-operated holdings differ from men-operated holdings in terms of agricultural practices and agricultural services used. For example, in many countries, women farmers, who usually manage smaller holdings and own less or no land, have lower access to formal credit or other financial services and rely more heavily on informal sources of credit. Women farmers also tend to have more limited access to agricultural education and training, because traditionally, extension services have been tailored to men’s needs.

      Improving data collection from a gender perspective

      When data is collected at holding level, the role of different female and male members of the household in obtaining credit, accessing agricultural information or using irrigation or technology on their own sub-holdings, remain obscured. For example, when a holding managed by a man, or jointly managed by a woman and a man, is recorded as having obtained a formal credit, it is not clear who in the household actually applied for and obtained credit, and what parcels, crops, or sub-holdings benefited from it.

      As much as possible, data on use of agricultural services and agricultural practices should be collected at the sub-holding level. However, depending on the social structure of the society, data collection for a small number of items, such as use of credit, may be considered to be collected at the individual level, applying the questions either to all adult household members or to all sub-holders.

  • + References
    • Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), 2001. Agricultural censuses and gender considerations. Concept and methodology. Reprint.

      Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), 2007. A System of Integrated Agricultural Censuses and Surveys. Volume 1 – Revised reprint. Rome.

      Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Regional Office for Africa, 2005. Agricultural Censuses and Gender. Lessons learned in Africa. Accra.

      Fuwa, Nobuhiko, Shahidur R. Khandker, Andrew D. Mason, and Tara Vishwanath, 2000. “Intrahousehold Analysis”, in Designing Household Survey Questionnaires for Developing Countries. Lessons from 15 years of the Living Standards Measurement Study. Edited by Margaret Grossh and Paul Glewwe. World Bank, Washington DC.

      Grosh, Margaret, and Paul Glewwe (ed), 2000. Designing Household Survey Questionnaires for Developing Countries. Lessons from 15 years of the Living Standards Measurement Study. World Bank, Washington DC.

      Reardon Thomas, and Paul Glewwe, 2000. “Agriculture” in Designing Household Survey Questionnaires for Developing Countries. Lessons from 15 years of the Living Standards Measurement Study. Edited by Margaret Grossh and Paul Glewwe. World Bank, Washington DC.

      United Nations Statistics Division, 2001. Gender and Statistics Briefing Note. Agriculture. New York.

ScrewTurn Wiki version 3.0.5.600. Some of the icons created by FamFamFam.